About Florida's Turnpike

Innovation Breeds Success

An innovative experiment combining the best of both the government and business worlds, Florida's Turnpike Enterprise utilizes the best practices of the private sector while operating in the public interest. Operating as a separate business unit of the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT), Florida's Turnpike has expanded and increased revenue, while continuing to protect bondholders and improve customer service across the board. The results have been improved efficiency, cost-effectiveness and timely project delivery.

Over the past 12 years, Florida's Turnpike has made substantial improvements to the existing road system, acquired and assumed responsibility for a project completed by a local expressway authority, delivered six expansion projects, contracted most in-house functions to the private sector, promoted customer service, maintained financial stability and improved bond ratings.

Florida's Turnpike is now responsible for all operations on every FDOT-owned and operated toll road and bridge. This represents about 600 miles of roadway and 80 percent of all toll facilities in Florida. Florida's Turnpike strives to ensure every customer who travels these toll roads and bridges receives first class service on every trip.

Florida's Turnpike Mainline

Florida's Turnpike Map

Turnpike Mainline

Florida's Turnpike, also designated as State Road 91, is a user-financed, limited-access toll road that runs 312 miles, through 11 counties, beginning near Florida City in Miami-Dade County and terminating near Wildwood in Sumter County.

History

The Florida State Turnpike Authority was authorized by the Florida legislature and signed into law by Governor Dan McCarty as the Turnpike Authority Act on July 11, 1953. Originally designated the Sunshine State Parkway, the Turnpike was constructed in two major projects. The first project was the 110-mile route between Golden Glades and Ft. Pierce. The Parkway opened to traffic on January 25, 1957. In 1960, the Turnpike began a study for a proposed extension to Orlando. In 1961, Project II, from Ft. Pierce to Orlando was authorized.

The 61-mile section of the Parkway between Yeehaw Junction and south Orlando opened on July 17, 1963, but the section connecting Yeehaw Junction to Ft. Pierce did not open until November 22, 1963. The final section of the Parkway, and current northern limit of the Turnpike, opened at the connection with Interstate 75 in Sumter County on July 24, 1964. Interstate 4 was not complete when the northern project was constructed; that interchange was not completed until April 18, 1967.

On June 5, 1962, a meeting was held to discuss a proposed toll road from Orlando to Cape Canaveral. That road later became SR 528, the Bee Line Expressway. The 47-mile Homestead Extension of Florida's Turnpike (HEFT) and the eight-mile Bee Line Connector were approved as the third expansion project of the Turnpike in July 1969 when the Turnpike became part of the Florida Department of Transportation. Project III was funded through the sale of $115 million in 1970 Series Bonds. In early 1973, the HEFT opened to traffic between Golden Glades and US 27 (seven miles). The remaining sections of the Homestead extension opened to traffic in stages through May 1975. Meanwhile, on July 23, 1973, the Bee Line Connector opened to traffic between the Turnpike and McCoy Air Force Base Road, and on December 15, 1973 from the Turnpike to Interstate 4.

Evolution of the Turnpike

The Turnpike was reorganized and incorporated into the newly-formed Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) in July 1969. The Turnpike's functions became part of the FDOT pursuant to the reorganization of the State Government Act. At that time, individual FDOT Districts managed the Turnpike work program, operations and maintenance in their areas. In 1988, the Florida Legislature created the Office of Florida's Turnpike.

In 1990, the Legislature passed Senate Bill 1316, authorizing the expansion of Florida's Turnpike to include construction of non-contiguous road projects as an alternative to assist in meeting the State's backlog of needed highway facilities. The Legislature set environmental and financial feasibility standards, authorized toll increases on the existing system and allowed higher rate per mile tolls on the new projects through Chapter 339.2275(3) of the Florida Statutes. The Legislature approved expansion projects and new interchanges subject to verification of economic feasibility, determination that the projects are consistent, to the maximum extent feasible, with approved local government comprehensive plans were projects are located, and completion of a statement of the project's significant environmental impacts. Fifty road projects were submitted for consideration and, ultimately, ten new roads were identified for possible construction, subject to meeting the feasibility requirements, and 15 new interchanges. In addition, the Turnpike purchased the Sawgrass Expressway (Toll Road 869) from the Broward County Expressway Authority.

On April 11, 2002, Governor Bush signed House Bill 261, creating Florida's Turnpike Enterprise, and directing the Turnpike to pursue innovation and best private-sector business practices, to improve cost-effectiveness and timeliness in project delivery, to increase revenues and expand its capital program, and to improve quality of service to its customers. At that time, the Office of Toll Operations, formerly a separate division of the State of Florida, was folded into the Enterprise.

Currently, more than 2.2 million motorists use the Turnpike's system of roads every day. The Florida's Turnpike Enterprise five year work program (2016-2020) contains more than $3.7 billion in capital improvements, which include widening the mainline roadway, new interchanges, safety improvements, resurfacing improvements and maintenance.

Click here for a map of the Turnpike Mainline

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The Homestead Extension of Florida's Turnpike begins at the Miami-Dade4/Broward County line Milepost (47), travels west past Interstate 75 and continues south to the US 1 interchange (Exit 1) in Florida City, north of the Florida Keys.

The Homestead Extension is the most heavily traveled segment of Florida's Turnpike. In 2014, average daily traffic exceeded 172,000 vehicles at its busiest location, between the Don Shula Expressway (Exit 17) and State Road 836/Coral Reef Drive (Exit 16) interchanges.

Speed limits on the Homestead Extension vary from 70 mph on the eastern/northern end to 60 and 65 mph in the central and southern segments.

Construction of the Homestead Extension was completed in 1974.

Cosgrove On August 6, 2008 a segment of the Homestead Extension between Southwest 152nd and 216th streets in John F. Cosgrove Highway signPalmetto Bay and Cutler Bay was renamed �'ohn F. Cosgrove Highway.' The 2007 Legislature of Florida honored the late John F. Cosgrove, a former state representative and the first Mayor of Cutler Bay, who was best known for his get-tough legislation on insurance companies attempting to flee Florida following Hurricane Andrew. State Senator Larcenia J. Bullard (D-Miami) sponsored the bill creating the highway designation.

Click here for a map of the Homestead Extension

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Toll Road 589, part of Florida's Turnpike System, is a 57-mile, tolled, limited-access transportation corridor serving West Central Florida. It was constructed and completed as two separate roadway projects.

Sun CoastThe Veterans Expressway is the southern 15-mile portion of Toll Road 589, Suncoast Parkwayextending from near SR 60/Courtney Campbell Causeway west of Tampa International Airport to SR 597/Dale Mabry Highway in Hillsborough County. The project's design, right-of-way acquisition and construction originated with the Tampa-Hillsborough County Expressway Authority. In 1990, the Florida Legislature established the Florida's Turnpike expansion program and identified this road as one of the Turnpike expansion projects. The Veterans Expressway was officially named when CH.92-152 was passed by the Florida Legislature in 1992. The legislation dedicated the project to the veterans of all wars. Construction was completed on October 1, 1994 and the Turnpike assumed ownership and operating responsibility.

There are two mainline toll plazas on the Veterans Expressway, one located just north of Waters Avenue (Andersen Toll Plaza) and one located between Ehrlich Road and Hutchison Road interchanges (Sugarwood Toll Plaza). Eleven interchanges include Memorial Highway, Hillsborough Avenue, Waters Avenue, Andersen Road, Linebaugh Avenue, Wilsky Boulevard, Gunn Highway, Ehrlich Road, Hutchison Road, SR 568 (spur to Dale Mabry Highway) and Van Dyke Road.

Since the Veterans expressway opened in 1994, traffic volumes have steadily increased. To provide a better ride for everyone in the Tampa Bay region, Florida's Turnpike Enterprise conducted a Project Development and Environment(PD&E) Study to address three major objectives: 1) the need for additional capacity, 2) improved access to/from the Veterans Expressway and 3) a more efficient toll collection system. At the conclusion of the study it was determined that the improvements will involve widening the existing four-lane limited-access toll road to an eight-lane limited-access toll road, implementing a more efficient all-electronic toll collection system, and interchange improvements at Waters Avenue, Anderson Road, Linebaugh Avenue, Gunn Highway, Ehrlich Road and Hutchison Avenue. The Veterans Expressway converted to all-electronic tolling in stages from June through September 2014.

The Suncoast Parkway Project I is the 42-mile portion of Toll Road 589, connecting with the Veterans Expressway in northwest Hillsborough County, extending through Pasco County, and terminating in northern Hernando County at US 98, near the Hernando-Citrus County line.

Construction of the $507 million Suncoast Parkway began in the summer of 1998. The project opened to traffic in two phases. In February 2001 the section extending from Veterans Expressway to SR 50 in Hernando County opened, and the final section from SR 50 to US 98 opened in August 2001. Interchanges are located at Van Dyke Road, SR 54, SR 52, Pasco/Hernando County Line Road, Spring Hill Drive, SR 50 and the terminus at US 98.

Sun CoastThe Suncoast Parkway is the Turnpike's only facility incorporating a multiuse recrSuncoast Traileation trail into the design and construction of a limited-access roadway. The 42-mile trail corridor is contained within and along the west side of the Suncoast Parkway. It provides an alternative route for safe bicycle and pedestrian commuting for local residents and also serves as a regional recreational facility for residents of the region and visitors from throughout Florida.

In cooperation with Hillsborough, Pasco and Hernando counties, the Suncoast Trail has been designated as a �Millennium Trail: by the White House Millennium Council, a National Recreation Trail by the United States Department of the Interior, and part of Florida's Greenways and Trails system.

Click here for a map of Veterans Expressway/Suncoast Parkway
Click here to visit the Florida Greenways and Trails website--Suncoast Trail information page
Click here for more information on the The Suncoast Parkway--A Florida Scenic Highway
Click here to download a map of the Suncoast Trail--a Florida recreational multi-use trail

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Toll Road 417 is a 55-mile, tolled, limited-access transportation corridor serving Osceola, Orange and Seminole Counties, and is a joint project of the Central Florida Expressway Authority (CFX) and Florida's Turnpike Enterprise.

Florida's Turnpike operates the northern 17 miles of Toll 417 as the Seminole Expressway, beginning at the Seminole County line and extending north to its terminus at Interstate 4 in Sanford. The OOCEA operates the middle section of Toll 417, from Milepost 6 in Orange County to Milepost 37.5 at the Seminole County line. This section is known as the Central Florida GreeneWay. The Turnpike also operates the southern end of Toll 417, from Milepost 1 at Interstate 4 to Milepost 6 in Orange County. This section of Toll 417 is known as the Southern Connector Extension, but it also referred to as the southern end of the Central Florida GreeneWay.

Lake JesupThe Seminole Expressway was built as two separate construction projects. The 12-mile Project I extended from the Orange County line, across the award-winning 2.1 mile Lake Jesup Bridge to a connection with US 17/92, just south of Sanford. One barrier toll plaza is included, just north of Lake Jesup.

Project I of the Seminole Expressway opened in sections. The section south of Aloma Avenue was acquired from the Seminole County Expressway Authority in April 1990. The balance of the project was constructed by the Turnpike and opened during 1994. The section north to Red Bug Lake Road opened on January 11, 1994. The section north to SR 434 opened on April 2, 1994, and the final section to US 17/92 opened on May 9, except for the northern ramps at SR 434, which opened on June 16.

Construction of Project II of the $265 million Seminole Expressway began in the fall of 1999. On September 15, 2002, a ribbon-cutting ceremony was held for the six-mile project, which opened to traffic between US 17/92 and Interstate 4 the following morning.

Lake JesupA Project Development and Environment Study began in 2006 was completed in 2007 to assess needs for the widening of the Seminole Expressway. Initial plans call for interim widening the Seminole from four to six lanes between Aloma and SR 434, with an ultimate eight-lane configuration.

The southern end of Toll 417 is known as the Southern Connector Extension. Construction began in December 1994, and was funded by the Turnpike and four private-sector partners. The Southern Connector joins the section of the Central Florida GreeneWay operated by the CFX and extends to Interstate 4 in Osceola County. There are interchanges with the Osceola Parkway (a tolled road constructed and operated by Osceola County) and the US 192 connector in Disney's Celebration project. There is one mainline toll plaza located east of Interstate 4. This six-mile, $123 million project opened to traffic on June 23, 1996.

Click here for a map of Seminole Expressway
Click here for a map of Southern Connector

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The Martin Andersen Beachline Expressway (formerly known as the Bee Line) is a 40-mile east-west tolled, limited-access transportation corridor serving Central Florida and the Space Coast. The road is owned and operated by Florida's Turnpike Enterprise and the Central Florida Expressway Authority (CFX).

Florida's Turnpike Enterprise operates the western-most eight miles as the Beachline Expressway West and the eastern 22 miles as the Beachline East Expressway, whileCFX operates from milepost eight to milepost 31.

The Beachline West begins at Interstate 4 near the International Drive resort area. As a result, traffic is primarily tourists traveling around the various hotels, tourist attractions and restaurants, as well as Orlando International Airport.

House Bill 385 became effective on July 1, 2005, changing the Martin Andersen Bee Line Expressway to the Martin Andersen Beachline Expressway in an effort to spur tourism and promote Central Florida beaches.

On july 1, 2014, the Turnpike purchased the eastern end of Toll 528 -- Beachline East Expressway, a 22-mile facility, from the Florida Department of Transportation. The Beachline East extends east from State Road 520 in Orange County for six miles into Brevard County, where it splits into two branches. The seven-mile northeast branch becomes State Road 407 and extends to a connection with State Road 405, while the nine-mile southeast branch continues as SR 528 to a connection with the Bennett Causeway at US 1.

Click here for a map of Beachline Expressway West
Click here for a map of Beachline Expressway East

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The Polk Parkway, Toll Road 570, is an expansion project of Florida's Turnpike Enterprise. The Parkway is a 25-mile limited-access toll road connecting major Polk County cities to each other and to Interstate 4. Motorists enjoy a direct link between south Lakeland, Bartow, Auburndale, Polk City and the western suburbs of Winter Haven by way of the Polk Parkway. Completed in 1999, the road is a valuable link in both Florida's Intrastate Highway System and in the Turnpike's network of more than 454 miles of user-financed roadways.

Sandhill CranesThe $490 million Polk Parkway was conceived by local officials in the 1950s ago as a circumferential route around Lakeland. Funding was not available to build the roadway, and plans for it were abandoned and revived several times over ensuing years. Revived again in 1986, the proposed road was designed the Imperial Parkway by the Polk County Board of County Commissioners. In the spring of 1990, the Florida Legislature passed Senate Bill 1316, allowing the Turnpike to build non-contiguous road prSandhill Cranes near Airport Road on Polk Parkwayojects. Fifty projects were submitted for consideration as possible new roads. The Polk Parkway was one of ten possible projects eventually identified by the legislature for consideration in the expansion program.

  • Groundbreaking for the Parkway was 25 January 1996.
  • The Western end, a 7.5 stretch of the Parkway, opened to traffic on 9 August 1998.
  • The second (central) section, approximately 10 miles in length, opened to traffic on 2 August 1999.
  • The final section opened to traffic on 12 December 1999, and is approximately 7.5 miles long.

The 1998 Florida Legislature designated the western seven miles of the Polk Parkway (between Interstate 4 and South Florida Avenue (SR 37) as the James Henry Mills Medal of Honor Parkway in recognition of his heroic actions in World War II in Cisterna Italy. A native Polk Countian, James Henry Mills was the only resident of the county to receive a medal of honor in World War II.

Click here for a map of the Polk Parkway

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The Sawgrass Expressway (Toll 869) is a 23-mile facility in Broward County. The expressway extends from its junction with Interstate 75 in Weston to its interchange with Florida's Turnpike and Southwest 10th Street in Deerfield Beach.

The Sawgrass Expressway was built by the Broward County Expressway Authority and opened to traffic in 1986. It became part of Florida's Turnpike System in December 1990, when it was acquired by the Florida Department of Transportation.

In April 2014, the Sawgrass Expressway converted to an all-electronic tolling roadway.

Click here for a map of Sawgrass Expressway

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The Daniel Webster Western Beltway Part C is an 11-mile, $313 million, limited-access toll road providing an alternate north-south route between Florida's Turnpike and Interstate 4. Located west of Orlando near the Disney/Celebration attractions corridor, the Western Beltway also provides easy access to Toll 417 (the Central Florida GreeneWay). Full interchanges are located at Interstate 4, Sinclair Road, US 192 and Western Way. A partial interchange is located at Seidel Road.

Click here for a map of Daniel Webster Western Beltway
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The I-4 Connector is the Turnpike's latest expansion project, which opened onon January 6, 2014. The Connector is a series of ramps that connect Interstate 4 with the Selmon Expressway west of 31st Street in Tampa.

This elevated roadway links these two major east-west corridors, relieving congestion at the Downtown Interchange by diverting traffic off Interstates 4 and 275 in the Historic Ybor City area. It also significantly improves traffic flow on the arterial roadways in Ybor by requiring commercial trucks to use the ramps or find alternate routes to the Port of Tampa. While the route is open to traffic, construction activities continue. The Connector is an all-electronic facility, so vehicles must use SunPass or be billed at a higher rate with TOLL-BY-PLATE. Cash is not accepted on the I-4 Connector.

Click here for a map of the I-4 Connector

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Florida's Turnpike: Providing Transportation Alternatives for 55 Years!

Construction began in the mid-1950s on Florida's Turnpike and was completed in 1957 when the Sunshine State's landscape was mainly rural and drivers needed to cover long distances. Today, most motorists along Florida's Turnpike are short-distance commuters. Prior to Florida's Turnpike, most motorists traveling through Central Florida used U.S. 27. Now, Florida's Turnpike handles the bulk of traffic from Orlando to Florida's major east coast cities.

Take a look at the following milestones noting Florida's Turnpike's auspicious beginnings:

  1. 1957 - The original 110-mile stretch of roadway from the Golden Glades in Miami to Fort Pierce, known as the Sunshine State Parkway, opens under the direction of the now-defunct Florida State Turnpike Authority.
  2. 1964 - The second section of the Sunshine State Parkway from Fort Pierce to Wildwood was completed.
  3. 1974 - The final section opened with the addition of the 47-mile Homestead Extension of Florida's Turnpike from Miami to Homestead.
  4. 1986 - The Sawgrass Expressway/Toll 869 opened to traffic providing a bypass around Fort Lauderdale to Miami for those motorists traveling south from the Turnpike's mainline.
  5. 1990 - The Sawgrass Expressway was acquired by Florida's Turnpike District as a result of legislative action.
  6. 1990 to the present - Florida's Turnpike opened nine new system interchanges, added many miles of widening projects and made substantial improvements to the roadway, toll and service plazas. Florida's Turnpike has also made substantial investments in electronic toll collection and intelligent transportation systems.
  7. 1999 - Created by the Florida Department of Transportation, SunPass, the innovative electronic prepaid toll program, is implemented across most of Florida's toll roads, saving drivers time, money and the hassles of digging for change. Dedicated SunPass lanes process up to 1,800 vehicles per hour - 300 percent more than a manual toll lane. SunPass transponders are now available for purchase through Florida's Turnpike service plazas, all CVS/Pharmacy Stores and Publix Super Markets in Florida.
  8. 2002 - Florida's Turnpike Enterprise was created by the Florida Department of Transportation.
  9. 2005 - Currently, more than two million motorists are SunPass customers with more joining the program each day.
  10. 2005 - Florida's Turnpike, its expansion projects, and other toll roads take motorists from the top of the Florida Keys up to I-75 north of Orlando in North Central Florida, including the 47-mile Homestead Extension, the 23-mile Sawgrass Expressway in Broward County, the 19-mile Seminole Expressway in Seminole County, the 15-mile Veterans Expressway in Tampa, an eight-mile section of the Beachline Expressway in Orlando, the six-mile Southern Connector Extension of the Central Florida Greeneway in Orlando, the 25-mile Polk Parkway, and the southern 11 miles of the Daniel Webster Western Beltway in Orange and Osceola Counties.
  11. 2011 - Florida's Turnpike converted the southern 47 miles of the Turnpike in Miami-Dade County to All-Electronic Tolling in February of 2011. Motorists never have to stop to pay a toll; they use SunPass or will be billed via TOLL-BY-PLATE.

Highway Safety Memorial Markers

In order to increase public awareness of highway safety, it is the Florida Department of Transportation's policy to allow placement of memorial markers within the Florida's Turnpike Right of Way. The purpose of these markers is to memorialize people who have died as a result of a vehicle related crash and to remind motorists to protect human life by driving safely. The cost for the construction, installation, maintenance and removal of the memorial marker will be covered by the Florida Department of Transportation. The markers will be allowed to remain in place for a minimum of one year.

Requests for memorial markers may be made by immediate family members or friends of deceased car crash victims. These requests should be submitted in writing to the address below:

Ms. Stephanie Shinabery
Florida's Turnpike Enterprise
Florida's Turnpike Operations Center
PO Box 9828
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33310
(954) 934-1219
(954) 934-1354 (fax)

Reports from Florida's Turnpike

Click on the links below to open a PDF document for financial and other reports from Florida's Turnpike.

Comprehensive Annual Financial Report

2016

2015

2014

2013

2012


Traffic Engineer's Annual Report

2016

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
MAPS

Overview

GROWTH INDICATORS

MAINLINE

EXPANSION

SUNPASS

CONCESSION REVENUE

FORECAST SUMMARY

APPENDICES


2015

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
MAPS

Overview

GROWTH INDICATORS

MAINLINE

EXPANSION

SUNPASS

CONCESSION REVENUE

FORECAST SUMMARY

APPENDICES


2014

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
MAPS

Overview

GROWTH INDICATORS

MAINLINE

EXPANSION

SUNPASS

CONCESSION REVENUE

FORECAST SUMMARY

APPENDICES


2013

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
MAPS

Overview

GROWTH INDICATORS

MAINLINE

EXPANSION

SUNPASS

CONCESSION REVENUE

FORECAST SUMMARY

APPENDICES

2012

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
MAPS

OVERVIEW

GROWTH INDICATORS

MAINLINE

EXPANSION

SUNPASS

CONCESSION REVENUE

FORECAST SUMMARY

APPENDICIES

Turnpike Annual Report

Toll Operations Annual Report

For information on Alligator Alley (Everglades Parkway), Pinellas Bayway System, Sunshine Skyway Bridge, Beachline East Expressway (2012-2014 only), 95 and 595 Express (2012-2015 only), Wekiva Parkway, Garcon Point Bridge and Mid-Bay Bridge Authority System --see the Traffic Engineers Annual Report below for 2016.

2016
2015
2014
2013
2012

Other Reports

Florida's Turnpike Organizational Chart

Florida's Turnpike Org Chart

Investor Relations

Florida's Turnpike System is part of the Florida Department of Transportation, an agency of the State of Florida. The Turnpike manages 461 miles of separate toll road facilities. The revenues collected on the System are pledged for the repayment of revenue bonds.

The mission of the Turnpike is to help meet the State's growing transportation needs, ensuring value to customers, protecting investors and managing the Turnpike System in a business-like manner.


Annual Reports

Monthly Reports

Latest Bond Rating Statements and Reports

Bond Official Statements

Additional Information

FAQ

Have a question about Florida's Turnpike? Be sure to check out the following answers to some of the most frequently asked questions handled by our customer service representatives recently.

1. Why do I have to pay tolls when I already pay taxes?
2. When was the original Turnpike paid off and why are tolls still being collected?
3. What do you do with the tolls collected? How much money do you collect?
4. Why should I pay tolls so that you can build toll roads in other areas of the State?
5. What is the SunPass® prepaid toll program?
6. The New York State Thruway toll rate is three cents per mile. Why is it double in Florida?
7. How do you decide where to put an interchange or build a new highway?

1. Why do I have to pay tolls when I already pay taxes?
If the state had enough gas tax funding to pay for all of its transportation needs, there would be no need for toll roads. However, Florida is facing a $31 billion shortfall in funding identified transportation improvements through 2010, and a $47 billion shortfall through 2020. All Florida motorists pay in some way, whether by toll, gas tax, developer fees, etc. In many cases, tolls are the most cost-effective way to directly link user fees to specific roads. Your tolls support the maintenance and improvement of Florida's toll roads. These roads are self-supporting; freeing highway tax money for other needed road projects.

2. When was the original Turnpike paid off and why are tolls still being collected?
All revenue bonds sold prior to 1989, including the bonds borrowed to build the original Turnpike, have been paid. Revenue bond issues since 1989 make up Florida's Turnpike's existing $2.8 billion 30-year bond debt obligation. In 1988, when the original bonds were nearly paid, the Florida Transportation Commission (FTC), a civilian oversight group of the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) appointed by the Governor, supported a visionary financing plan for Florida's Turnpike system to use the bonding capacity of the Turnpike to finance new Florida Intrastate Highway System projects. In time, the tolls collected would help finance future statewide transportation projects.

In an effort to alleviate intrastate traffic problems, the 1990 Florida Legislature passed legislation enacting the Commission's plan, and directed Florida's Turnpike to begin the implementation and funding of an ambitious expansion program. As of May 2007, the Florida Department of Transportation, using toll revenue and Florida's Turnpike bonding capability, has added 150 miles of new roads to Florida's Intrastate Highway System. The collected toll revenue has also funded the construction of 15 new interchanges and additional lanes on the Turnpike's mainline, improving access and traffic flow. Currently, the Turnpike's bonding capacity is $10 billion.

3. What do you do with the tolls collected? How much money do you collect?
Florida's Turnpike revenue comes from tolls collected on the 483-mile statewide system (including the 22-mile Beachline East Expressway aquired on July 1, 2014) and from concession sales. In fiscal year 2014, $796 million was collected in toll revenue. All revenue is reinvested into Florida's Turnpike's statewide work program to pay: operations and maintenance expenses; improvements for renovations, resurfacing, widening, new interchanges, and safety upgrades; and, interest and principal on bonded debt. Relating to interest and principal on the bonds (i.e., annual debt service), outstanding bond issues cover various improvement projects on the existing Mainline system, Sawgrass Expressway in Broward County, and the Beachline West and East Expressways in Orange and Brevard Counties. Additionally, these bonds also cover Florida Intrastate Highway System expansion projects including the Seminole Expressway, the Southern Connector Extension of Toll Road 417 and the Western Beltway Part C in the greater Orlando area, the Veterans Expressway and the I-4 Connector in Tampa, the Suncoast Parkway in Pasco and Hernando counties and the Polk Parkway in Lakeland.

4. Why should I pay tolls so that you can build toll roads in other areas of the State?
All revenue from Florida's Turnpike is reinvested into projects building new highways or making improvements to existing highways on a statewide basis. When the Florida Legislature passed its Transportation Bill in April 1997, several initiatives were passed regarding the future of Florida's Turnpike through 2020. A main initiative of the bill establishes a funding equity formula based on toll revenue collected that will ensure South Florida (Palm Beach, Broward and Miami-Dade counties) receives its fair share of funding.


5. What is the SunPass® prepaid toll program?
SunPass is an innovative statewide prepaid toll system implemented by the FDOT on most of Florida's toll roads. SunPass saves commuters time and money, creating more efficient, less congested roadways. A small electronic device (transponder) is attached just below the rearview mirror inside your windshield and communicates with special toll plaza antennas. As your car passes through the toll plaza (in SunPass-only or mixed-use lanes), the plaza equipment electronically deducts the toll charge from your prepaid toll account. Find out how you can save time and money on www.SunPass.com and become a SunPass customer today!

6. The New York State Thruway Mainline electronic toll rate is 4.5 cents per mile. Why is it higher for the Mainline System in Florida?
Florida Statute 338.165(3) mandates that all FDOT-owned toll roads and bridges index tolls for inflation no more frequently than once a year and no less frequently than once every five years. Pursuant to this requirement, tolls were increased in 2012 for the first time and subsequently in July 2013, July 2014 and July 2015 for SunPass and TOLL-BY-PLATE customers. At 7 cents per mile on the Mainline for SunPass customers, Florida’s Turnpike rates continue to be in the mid range when compared nationally.

7. How do you decide where to put an interchange or build a new highway?
The decision on where to build new interchanges or highways is governed by Florida statute and bond covenants. The rules vary slightly by project type but, in general, new projects must meet a transportation need and be locally supported, environmentally suitable and economically feasible. Transportation need is evaluated by determining how much traffic a future project would serve and what type of relief it may provide for other transportation facilities. Local support is essential before construction can begin. Florida's Turnpike has never built an interchange or roadway that was not approved by local officials and Metropolitan Planning Organizations governing a specific area. Also, Florida's Turnpike prides itself on minimizing and mitigating any environmental impact from the construction throughout the process. Economic feasibility tests are conducted for new roadway projects as well. To pass these tests, a new roadway must pay 50 percent of its own bond indebtedness by the 12th year of opening to traffic and all of its own bond indebtedness by the 30th year of operation. Projects that pass these four tests are considered viable and must compete statewide with other possible projects.

Contact Us

Orlando Headquarters
Turkey Lake Service Plaza, Milepost 263
Ocoee, FL 34761
407-532-3999

SunPass and Toll Operations
Got in a SunPass lane by accident or received a notice in the mail: 888-865-5352
Status of payment you mailed in: 407-264-3164
Missed a toll payment because you had no change: 407-264-3164

Florida's Turnpike Public Information Offices
Toll Free: 800-749-7453
E-mail: turnpike.pio@dot.state.fl.us
The public information office is open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday.

Public Information
Eleanor Register Building
Turnpike Operations Center
P.O. Box 9828
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33310-9828
(954) 975-4855
FAX: (954) 934-1358
Toll Free 1-800-749-7453

Florida’s Turnpike Enterprise System

Chad Huff, Public Information Manager
Florida's Turnpike Operations Center
PO Box 9828
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33310
954-934-1289

Juliette Valencia, Public Information
(Spanish Language)
Florida's Turnpike Operations Center
PO Box 9828
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33310
954-934-1276

Construction Information

Central and Western Florida
(Orange, Osceola, Seminole, Polk, Hillsborough, Pasco, Hernando Counties)

Christa Deason or Christine Girardin
Florida’s Turnpike Enterprise
P.O. Box 613069
Ocoee, FL 34761
407-263-3492 or 954-934-1279

South Florida
(Miami-Dade, Broward, Palm Beach, Martin, St. Lucie, Indian River Counties)

Brian Keith Dorf
Florida's Turnpike Operations Center
PO Box 9828
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33310

Don't see the office you are looking for? E-mail your questions and comments today.