WELCOME!

The Florida’s Turnpike Enterprise appreciates your interest in this project. Please use the navigation menu to view public meeting videos and display boards. Clicking on the graphic will enlarge the view. The display boards are available for download on the main project website under the Documents section. If you wish to submit comments, please use the comment form below.

The study limits extend along Florida’s Turnpike from south of SR 408 at mile post 263 to SR 50 at mile post 273, and along SR 408 from the Turnpike interchange to east of the overpass at Old Winter Garden Road. The project is located within Orange County.

A PD&E Study determines if there is an engineering and environmentally feasible alternative to meet the future needs determined in the planning phase. It involves the preparation of preliminary engineering and environmental documentation.

Key components of the PD&E process include an evaluation of existing conditions, identification of future traffic needs, development of alternatives, and an evaluation of the alternatives based on environmental and engineering factors. An important component of the PD&E process is public and agency involvement. All findings and recommendations are documented at the end of the study. If a build alternative is selected, then the project moves forward into the design phase. For more information on the PD&E Study process visit the project website, scroll down to the Documents section, and under videos you will find the PD&E process video.

The purpose of this project is to increase capacity on Florida’s Turnpike Mainline from south of SR 408 to SR 50 to accommodate future traffic volumes generated by anticipated growth in Orange County and adjacent counties and to improve emergency evacuation times.

The need to improve this section of Florida’s Turnpike is based on improving safety, accommodating traffic demand, improving travel time reliability and system linkage, enhancing Central Florida’s economic viability, and enhancing emergency response and evacuation.

South of SR 408 and North of SR 429, Florida’s Turnpike consists of four lanes in each direction separated by inside shoulders and a median barrier wall. The existing right of way is approximately 300 feet wide. Noise walls are located along some segments, while fencing is provided in other areas.

Between SR 408 and SR 429, Florida’s Turnpike consists of six lanes in each direction, including two auxiliary lanes. Inside shoulders and a median barrier wall are also provided. The existing right of way is approximately 300 feet wide. Noise walls are located along some segments, while fencing is provided in other areas.

The mainline improvements were broken into three unique sections. The first segment extends from the beginning of the project, near the Turkey Lake Service Plaza to SR 408. The second segment is between SR 408 and SR 429. The last segment is from SR 429 to SR 50.

The proposed improvements for the first segment, from the Turkey Lake Service Plaza to SR 408, include five thru travel lanes and one auxiliary lane in each direction. There are currently four thru lanes in each direction on this stretch of Florida’s Turnpike, so the proposed improvements would add a total of two lanes in each direction.

The second segment, from SR 408 to SR 429, proposes a Collector-Distributor system, or CD system. The Turnpike mainline would be widened to five lanes in each direction serving the regional traffic passing through this segment. An additional four lanes in each direction would be provided along the outside in the form of a collector road, that will serve the high volume of traffic traveling between SR 408 and SR 429. These outside lanes will allow this system-to-system traffic to flow freely without having to interact with the mainline traffic, which will improve traffic operations and safety. The collector lanes will be barrier wall separated from the regular thru lanes.

The proposed improvements for the third segment, from the SR 429 to SR 50 includes five thru lanes in each direction. There are currently four thru lanes in each direction on this stretch of Florida’s Turnpike, so the proposed improvements would add one lane in each direction.

There are several on-going PD&E, design, and construction projects within and adjacent to the limits of this PD&E study.

This exhibit presents an alternative improvement concept for the northern project segment between mile post 271 to 273. The Turnpike mainline is shown as five lanes in each direction to meet the future traffic demands.  The SR 50 interchange improvement shown is one of three alternatives under consideration.  Please refer to the SR 50 Clermont exhibit to review all three alternatives. The legend on the exhibit provides a visual explanation of the symbols and lines.

This exhibit presents an alternative improvement concept for the second project segment between mile post 269 to 270. The Turnpike mainline is shown as five lanes in each direction to meet the future traffic demands. The Avalon Road interchange improvement shown is one of three alternatives under consideration.  Please refer to the Avalon Road Interchange exhibit to review all three alternatives. The legend on the exhibit provides a visual explanation of the symbols and lines used.

This exhibit presents an alternative improvement concept for the third project segment between mile post 266 to 268. The Turnpike mainline is shown as five lanes in each direction to meet the future traffic demands north of the SR 429 interchange.  A collector-distributor road system is shown between SR 429 and SR 408 that will provide direct connections between these two major interchanges. Please refer to the SR 408 to SR 429 System for a more detailed view of the proposed improvements between SR 408 and SR 429.  The legend on the exhibit provides a visual explanation of the symbols and lines used.

This exhibit presents an alternative improvement concept for the southern project segment between mile post 263 to 267.  The Turnpike mainline is shown as six lanes in each direction south of the SR 408 interchange to meet the future traffic demands. A collector-distributor road system is shown between SR 429 and SR 408 that will provide direct connections between these two major interchanges. Please refer to the SR 408 to SR 429 System for a more detailed view of the proposed improvements between SR 408 and SR 429.  The legend on the exhibit provides a visual explanation of the symbols and lines used.

This exhibit presents the three viable interchange improvement concepts developed for this interchange: Flyover Alternative, Parallel Flow Alternative, and Single Point Alternative. The evaluation matrix presents a comparison of the characteristics of the three build alternatives and the No-Build alternative. The proposed typical section depicts the Turnpike mainline after the proposed widening has been constructed. The photo simulation portrays what the Parallel Flow Alternative might look like after construction.  This is for reference only.

This exhibit presents the three viable interchange improvement concepts developed for this interchange: Tight Urban Diamond Alternative, Turbo Roundabout Alternative, and Diverging Diamond Alternative. All three alternatives show a match line with the Orange County project to the north, which will widen Avalon Road to four lanes up to the SR 50 intersection. Avalon Road would be widened to the south to four-lanes as shown on the typical section inset.  This proposed widening would extend to the Sunridge Elementary and Middle School entrance located approximately one-half mile south of the interchange.  The evaluation matrix presents a comparison of the characteristics of the three build alternatives and the No-Build alternative.

This exhibit depicts the proposed improvements to the Turnpike interchange with SR 429. This concept is also depicted on the SR 408 to SR 429 System Exhibit.  The evaluation matrix presents a comparison of the characteristics of the Build alternative and the No-Build alternative. The proposed typical sections depict the Turnpike mainline north and south of the interchange, after the proposed widening has been constructed.

This exhibit depicts the proposed improvements to the Turnpike interchange with SR 408. This concept is also depicted on the SR 408 to SR 429 System Exhibit.  The evaluation matrix presents a comparison of the characteristics of the Build alternative and the No-Build alternative. The photo simulation portrays what the interchange modifications might look like after construction.  This is for reference only.

This exhibit presents the two alternatives developed and evaluated for the SR 50 Connector interchange. Option 1 maintains the existing configuration and adds an eastbound right turn lane to SR 50. The exit ramp shifts to the west to increase the distance to the Marshall Farms intersection and installs an actuated traffic signal to help control the traffic flow. Option 2 proposes a more comprehensive reconfiguration of the interchange that would provide a new signalized intersection. The evaluation matrix presents a comparison of the characteristics of the Build alternatives and the No-Build alternative.

This exhibit depicts the proposed improvements to the Turnpike segment between SR 408 and SR 429, including modifications at both the SR 408 and SR 429 interchanges. The Turnpike mainline would be expanded to include dedicated lanes that provide direct connections between the SR 408 and SR 429 interchanges. The exhibit includes one of the alternatives improvements for the SR 50 (Ocoee / Winter Garden) interchange. Please refer to the SR 50 Connector exhibit to review both alternatives for this connection.

As part of the study, Florida’s Turnpike Enterprise will evaluate the potential social, natural, physical, and cultural effects of the project. Every effort will be made to avoid or minimize impacts to these features. Impacts that cannot be avoided will be mitigated.

If you would like to speak with someone regarding this project, please contact one of the Turnpike representatives listed here.

After tonight’s meeting, Florida’s Turnpike Enterprise will evaluate the public comments received, continue meeting with stakeholders, and refine the Build Alternatives. The Public Hearing, where Florida’s Turnpike Enterprise will recommend a preferred alternative to move forward to the design phase, is tentatively scheduled for early 2022. Each of these meetings represents additional opportunities for feedback. The State Environment Impact Report (SEIR) represents the end of the PD&E study and is scheduled for June 2022.

This project is being developed in accordance with the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Under Title VI of the Civil Rights Act, public participation is solicited without regard to race, color, national origin, age, sex, religion, disability, or family status. Please contact one of the Title VI coordinators shown here to express any concerns regarding Florida Turnpike’s compliance with Title VI.

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